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Inside this Issue:

1. Questions and answers about child eczema and mom's hand eczema
An Interview with Dr. Katie Fine, Pediatrician

“After my son was born, he developed eczema on his face. I didn’t mind using the mild steroid creams but it would come right back and I didn’t want to use the steroid cream all the time. As I started using it on him my own hand eczema got better.”
Click here to read the entire article.

2. Mother's frustration with baby's facial eczema ends

“I realize that there are many parents searching for something to relieve the discomfort that accompanies this skin condition. Therefore, I am determined to share my experience!”
Click here to read the entire article.

3. New study suggests both anti-irritant and UVB protection as benefits of Proteque use

Dr. Nancy Monteiro-Riviere, Professor of Investigative Dermatology at North Carolina State University, studied a common irritant found in many shampoos and soap products – sodium lauryl sulfate. Proteque helped prevent irritation. Also the study suggested it has the ability to reduce irritation after exposure to a common irritant. It can also protect against the sun’s damaging UVB rays.
Click here to read the entire article.

4. Hand eczema comes in many different forms

If your hands are red, and peel, crack or flake easily you may know you suffer from hand eczema, also known as hand dermatitis. But did you know that you could suffer from the disease even if your hands show no obvious signs?As Dr. Laura Skellchock, clinical associate professor of dermatology at the University of California, San Francisco writes in Skin Care Today, “people whose hands are sensitive, sting or burn easily and generally feel uncomfortable might also be suffering from eczema.”
Click here to read the entire article.

5. Protèque’s Recommended Internet Links

MEDLINE is a research web site sponsored by the U.S. government that provides online access to a wealth of research related to all medical topics including eczema. To access the full MEDLINE go to: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/PubMed/ .

Readers of this newsletter can get more information by exploring the Consumer Education or Physician Education sections including education and links to other sites. Go to our homepage at www.proteque.com

Do you have a question about controlling eczema or dermatitis? E-mail us at patty.brachman@proteque.com or call 800-953-9250 toll free. We’ll pass the question along to our panel of medical experts and post the answer on our web site.

 


1.  Questions and answers about child eczema and doctor's hand eczema - Dr. Katie Fine, Pediatrician

Dr. Katie Fine is a pediatrician at North Raleigh Pediatric Group in Raleigh, N.C. A graduate of Furman University, she earned her medical degree from Northwestern University, and completed her residency at Johns Hopkins Medical Center.

When did you start experiencing eczema?

One winter while I was in medical school I developed follicular eczema (a form of the disease that looks like bumps.) It was the result of the dry indoor heat and the need to constantly wash my hands.

How did you treat it?

With a steroid cream. At night I would smear on a thick layer of Vaseline and put on gloves.

When did you start using Proteque?

After my son was born. He developed eczema on his face. I didn’t mind using the mild steroid creams but it would come right back and I didn’t want to use the steroid cream all the time.  As I started using it on him my own hand eczema got better.

Why not just keep using the steroids?

There are side effects. Thinning of the skin is the big one. There can be changes in the skin that make it unattractive or more susceptible to complications. For children, there are also growth issues. With oral or inhaled steroids, growth can be affected. While that has never been proven with topical steroids, minute amounts probably do get in the bloodstream.

How is Proteque different than other non-steroid over-the-counter products?

I like the way it sinks into the skin so rapidly. It made David’s skin feel very soft without the greasiness of lotions or ointments. For children in diapers, it’s good because traditional creams wreck the effectiveness of the sticky tabs that hold the diaper on.  And, of course, it also has none of the harmful side effects of steroid creams.

Can Proteque be used with steroid creams?

Yes and if you’ve treated an initial outbreak with steroids, you can use Proteque to keep an outbreak from recurring.

Severe eczema can lead to skin infections, but do patients complain about the milder forms?

Yes.  People are pretty upset about the way it looks – especially if it is on a baby’s face.  It’s also itchy and it can ooze.

How do you use Proteque?

I apply it three times daily. For my son, I apply it once a day, all over his body, after his bath.

What other tips do you have for parents trying to control eczema without steroids?

Consult your pediatrician for any ongoing skin problems your baby or child might be having. In the meantime, cut down on bathing and use a moisturizing soap. Also consider gentle detergents. For severe cases, you and your pediatrician should consider the possibility of food allergies.

Do you have a question about controlling eczema or dermatitis? E-mail us at patty.brachman@proteque.com or call 800-953-9250 toll free. We’ll pass the question along to our panel of medical experts and post the answer on our web site.

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2. Mother's frustration with baby's facial eczema ends


When my daughter was six months old she began to develop a rash on her face.  This rash would start with little red bumps in the chin area and spread to her cheeks and up to her eyes.    Within a couple days she would scratch her itchy skin until it was bright red, cracked and bleeding in some areas. Her condition worsened.  She would wake up at night crying and rubbing her face on her pillow. She scratched constantly during the day and I was worried about infection. This constant irritation interfered with everything she did.  Sometimes she couldn't even laugh without pausing to rub the irritated skin with her little hands. My heart ached for my daughter when I would see the sadness in her eyes.

I realize that doctors see eczema a lot, but they don't realize how stressful it is for a mother to watch her child battle a problem 24 hours a day for months at a time. At my daughter's fifteen-month check up, I shared my discouragement with the pediatrician. 

For 10 months I had been using hydrocortisone or topical prescription corticosteroid creams for my daughter's condition.  I'd visited a dermatologist, applied anti-fungal and antibiotic creams and given her oral anti-fungal medicine. While she stayed on the steroid cream, her skin stayed clear.  As soon as we cut it out, it got worse than ever. I knew keeping her on the steroid cream long-term was not a good solution because of the potential for side effects. There had to be something that would help her! 

The only suggestion my doctor had was to take her off all dairy products for six weeks and see if this would help.

I decided to search the Internet for other solutions. That's how I found Proteque. At first I was worried that your product sounded "too good to be true", but I went ahead and ordered it. I was particularly pleased with the customer service I received. I asked how best to use the product and they suggested something I hadn't realized. By applying it to both her face and hands (she doesn't have hand eczema) the Proteque would keep the bacteria on her hands from infecting the delicate skin on her face.  I began by applying Proteque to her hands and face each morning and using a moisturizer on her face during the day to help with the dry skin.Within a week there was a remarkable difference. 

I have been using Proteque for two months now.  I rarely need to use additional moisturizers and have not used a drop of steroid cream since the day I began this treatment.  Her skin looks wonderful.  She is more content during the day and sleeps better at night. I am so thankful!

I realize that there are many parents searching for something to relieve the discomfort that accompanies this skin condition. Therefore, I am determined to share my experience!

-- D. Ulmer,  South Dakota

Editor's Note: Each month we'll share a story, that can help others, of a patient or doctor who has successfully managed eczema or dermatitis. Send your story to Fax: 305-223-5510 or E-mail: patty.brachman@proteque.com We look forward to hearing from you.

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3. New Study Suggests Both Anti-Irritant And UVB Protection As Benefits Of Proteque Use

Proteque not only helps prevent irritation, studies suggest it has the ability to reduce irritation after exposure to a common irritant. It can also protect against the sun’s damaging UVB rays.

In a study conducted by Dr. Nancy Monteiro-Riviere, Professor of Investigative Dermatology at North Carolina State University, a common irritant found in many shampoos and soap products – sodium lauryl sulfate – was rubbed on several pigs.

After the pigs’ skin was irritated, Dr. Monteiro-Riviere applied Proteque. “Application of Proteque lotion significantly reduced SLS-induced irritation when applied after SLS treatment,’’ said Dr. Monteiro-Riviere at the American Academy of Dermatology Conference in July 1999.

Dr. Monteiro-Riviere also tested Proteque’s ability to block UVB rays. She pre-treated the pigs skin with Proteque and exposed them to enough UVB rays to cause irritation with no screen application. “Proteque reduced UVB-induced sunburn cell formation from 50 to 3, and reduced histological skin damage significantly,’’ Dr. Monteiro-Riviere stated.

“We’ve known for awhile that Proteque not only helps prevent irritation but also combats already irritated skin. We’ve also known it has UVB-protecting properties. This just confirms it,’’ said Fred Brachman, President of Proteque International, the company that makes the steroid-sparing over-the-counter lotion. “We’re excited about the next step which is reproducing these tests on humans.’’

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4. Hand eczema comes in many different forms

If your hands are red, and peel, crack or flake easily you probably know you suffer from hand eczema, also known as hand dermatitis. But did you know that you could suffer from the disease even if your hands show no obvious signs?

As Dr. Laura Skellchock, clinical associate professor of dermatology at the University of California, San Francisco writes in Skin Care Today, people whose hands are sensitive, sting or burn easily and generally feel uncomfortable might also be suffering from eczema.

Regardless of how the illness appears, cases are divided into two broad categories: (1) hand eczema caused by substances that come in contact with the skin and (2) hand eczema that is hereditary in nature. People in the second category often suffer from allergies, asthma or sinus problems as well.

Sufferers of the type of eczema that comes from exposure to substances aren’t alone – nearly 15 percent of the U.S. population suffers from it. Here are some facts about contact dermatitis:

·        Reactions don’t always occur right away. It’s more common for the dermatitis to appear 1 to 4 days after contact.

·        Plants like Poison Ivy and Poison Oak are famous for causing reactions but so can seemingly innocuous plants like chrysanthemums.

·        Foods such as garlic, onions and parsley can trigger dermatitis.

 One of the most common ways to contract dermatitis, says Dr. Skellchock, is to keep your hands wet all the time. She recommends washing hands with mild soap and cool water. You can not wash your hands in water hot enough to kill germs – using hot water simply dries out the skin much more.

Once you’ve got a bad case of it dermatitis, medication may be required. Historically, doctors have turned to topical corticosteroids, but these drugs have side effects; chronic use may lead to thinning of the skin, explains Dr. Skellchock. Patients can also develop an allergy to the steroid or the ingredients it is formulated with.

The best medicine, says Dr. Skellchock, is to practice prevention. Avoid substances that make the condition worse (conduct a doctor for patch testing if necessary). Dr. Skellchock also recommends using a protectant lotion like Proteque. The cream can actually block the absorption of the irritant into the skin, preventing the reaction. Unlike topical steroid creams, Proteque is available without a prescription and can be used indefinitely.

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